Séverine Lannoy, Ph.D.

Education

Master degree in Clinical Psychology, Université catholique de Louvain
Ph.D. in Psychology, Université catholique de Louvain
Post-doc, Stanford University (Advisor: Edith V. Sullivan)
Post-doc, Virginia Commonwealth University (Advisor: Alexis C. Edwards)

Research Interests

• The role of genetic and environment in psychiatric disorders, particularly alcohol use disorder and suicidal behaviors.
• The role of genetic and environment in the development of psychological and neuropsychological processes.
• The evaluation of risk versus causal factors in psychiatric disorders.

Research Description

My research is broadly aimed at clarifying the risk factors involved in substance use and suicidal behaviors. Specifically, I am interested in delineating distinct and common pathways to substance use disorders and suicidal behaviors, by investigating aggregate genetic risks, their interaction with early adversity and proximal stressful life events, the subsequent development of psychological (resilience) and neuropsychological (impulsivity) characteristics, and their involvement in substance use disorders and suicidal behaviors. I am also interested in clarifying the causal influence of psychological and neuropsychological mechanisms by leveraging natural experiments (e.g., co-relative analysis).

Awards

Early Career Investigator Program Award and Travel Award, European Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism, 2019

Selected Publications

Lannoy, S., & Sullivan, E.V. Trajectories of brain development revealing times of risk and factors promoting resilience to alcohol use in adolescence. International Review of Neurobiology, in press.

Lannoy, S., Mange, J., Mauduy, M., Leconte, P., Ritz, L., Gierski, F., Maurage, P., & Beaunieux, H. (2020). Distinct psychological profiles among college students with substance use: A cluster analytic approach. Addictive Behaviors, 109, 106477.

Lannoy, S., Dormal, V., Billieux, J., Brion, M., D’Hondt, F., & Maurage, P. (2020). A dual-process exploration of binge drinking: evidence through behavioral and electrophysiological findings. Addiction Biology, 25:e12685.